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20121129
20121207
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Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
as the president's in this respect. rough the biggest aspects of the fiscal cliff is the fact that tax rates are going to go up on all americans. the senate has passed a bill that would give the middle class 98% of the people their tax cut. it is done. it's in a package. it's sitting at our desk. and all that has to happen is for the house to take it up. the only reason they're not taking it up is they want millionaires and billionaires to get their taxes cut, too. and this was a big issue in the campaign, thomas. so why don't we, instead of throwing insults, why don't they just pick up and pass that part as their own republican, tom cole suggested, let's have some good faith here, and we'll hammer out the rest of it. >> so senator, one thing you say about show me the money, if we talk about the lack of structural changes that are out there for entitlements, nbc's first read makes that point about that saying that the white house is sending the message that if republicans want entitlement reform, they're the ones who have to propose it. so is the white house forcing republicans basically to
that they're serious on negotiations. >> reporter: as the country fast approaches the fiscal cliff, the two sides are talking past each other. democrats say they've laid down their marker, hiking tax rates on wealthier americans. and it's up to republicans to propose specific spending cuts they want to entitlement programs. however, republicans say they've offered a concession, putting revenue on the table. and they say it's now up to the president and his fellow democrats to feel some pain and proposed cuts in medicare and medicaid. confusing? we asked harry reid. >> where is the disconnect? >> i don't understand his brain. so you should ask him, okay? >> from capitol hill to the white house, democrats are standing firm, saying the major hurdle remains whether to raise tax rates. what's next? where do things go? the top republican aide tells me they look forward to talking to the white house. >> time is still running out, too. >> and quickly. >> with us now are ryan lizza, the new yorker magazine's washington correspondent and cnn's senior political analyst ron bram's team. thank you both
and knock me out. apple. if we're going off the fiscal cliff, we know capital gains tax rates are going higher, right? right? that's obvious. do you really think the republicans have the power to keep those capital gains rates down? apple's become a referendum on the president's power and polling. right now he has the upper hand, then he can really roll them and intends to do so. it's reasonable to take some profits so you can pay the tax man less now rather than more later. it's a wimpy thing, it's logical, makes perfect economic sense. especially if you hold apple. so the stock gets hammered. it makes sense to sell it. but let's be less emotional and even clinical about this one. first, divide apple's share price by ten, now you have a stock that got crushed down to $54. when you do that arithmetic, it isn't all that scary, is it? where does the pessimism fit in? when we have to endure the pin the tail on the selloff game, what excuses for the selloff, myriad alibis i hear from today's action. apple's losing share to google, it doesn't have the right phones in europe, nokia's making a
. the reason? the fiscal cliff. if we go off the cliff, tax rates and dividends could more than triple or nearly triple from 15% to 43.4%. companies are racing to beat that tax hike by paying dividends before december 31st. arison is getting a potential tax savings up to $25 million. and larry ellison is getting savings of $56 million. tom frist will get more than $350 million from the company's dividend saving potential $100 million. and bain capital will get a piece of that and king of dividends is sheldon adelson. his tax savings on the dividend alone could be more than $340 million. all shareholders benefit from dividends and many of the ceos and owners recuse themselves from the dividend votes but these companies tend to have higher insider ownership. average inside ownership for dividend payers is around 27%. the average for the market as a whole around 7%. it all shows that if you can take next year's income today, you can also beat the tax man. simon? >> i mean, the question remains the degree to which you are harming the businesses by forcing cash out of them now. there are co
in their heels with no move to avoid the fiscal cliff. fiscal cliff negotiations have been at a stand still since monday when republicans proposed raising revenue by closing tax loopholes not by raising rates own the wealthy as the president has demanded. >> we're not insisting on rates out of spite but rather because we need to raise a certain amount of revenue. >> we can't keep borrowing mown and raising taxes and expect the problem to go away. >> with no solution in sight the white house budget is now ordering the pentagon and other an an jencies to finalize their plan to avoid massive spending cuts. >> secretary of state clinton says nato's decision missiles to turkey sends a clear message that tour ski is backed by its allies. the big concern remains an increasely desperate assad regime will turn to chemical weapons as rebel fighting rages on. the u.s. and its partners are looking to apply additional pressure on at a conference next week. the regime insists they would not use weapons against its people. >> a natural gas tanker arrived in japan today becoming the first vessel to successfully
with the fiscal cliff and there's hot rhetoric to go around. >> our members believe strongly that raising tax rates will hurt the economy. closing loopholes, especially on those who are wealthy, is a better way to raise this revenue. >> in order for us to raise the amount of revenue that's needed just by closing deductions and loopholes for high earners we'd have to, for example, eliminate or severely cap the char itible deduction. >> an obsession to raise taxes not going to solve the problem. what will solve the problem is doing something about the entitlements, taking on the wasteful spending in washington. >> and meantime, "the new york times" jonathan wiseman reports behind the scene republican leaders are considering the president's plan to extend middle class tax cuts now an address the debt and spending in the new year. here's republican senator tom coburn on "morning joe." >> actually, i would rather see the rates go up than the other way and greater chance to broaden the base in the future. >> do something, a down payment on cuts, on investments and revenue this year. and then in the
over the fiscal cliff, what do you have to lose, the rates are going to go up. i don't think it makes any difference two tim geithner says. >> it is so widely held by so many who want to play the stock market, let's say, beyond just the capital gains, whether it's in taxable account organization not and it also has the psychological impact that this is the one that i'm going to get out of because i'm afraid of what's coming in general? >> this is the stock, yes, it's cheap, now once it goes down, we have a million reasons, well, it's a nokia phone, well, it's china. ipad miniis available. this is a stock that's so widely owned. it reminds me of sirius satellite. every doctor, every dentist owns apple. they don't know the price per share, they just know it is the proxy for the market. >> they just accelerated dividends. but i think we're talking now 150 companies in some fashion have accelerated or put forward a special dividend. you put forward a special market share, china is 76, with the market share at least. >> is it a disappointment that apple did not pay a special dividend? is t
of coffee this morning. starbucks ceo has sobering advice to offer on the looming fiscal cliff, that the consequences will be far worse than last year's debt ceiling fight when the u.s. credit rating was downgraded for the first time ever. his message to lawmakers, now is not the time to play politics. it's about doing right by the american people. >> i think if people would get in the room and leave their ego behind, and not be so skewed towards the party but be so sensitive to the lens of the american people, we will have an agreement. >> poppy harlow is joining us with more. we've been talking about how this will affect us. schultz says this goes way beyond our boarders. >> it's global. something that stuck with me talking to him about this, the people who need a deal most will be hurt the most. here's why. >> this single issue has a seismic affect on the rest of the world, that we have never been as connected and the domino effect of a bad outcome here will have significant negative consequences, domestically and around the world, not the least of which will be the level --
dramatically higher interest rates because if they don't do a good deal for fiscal cliff and keep spending money, it's entirely possible this is going to be our come up -- >> the fed isn't big enough -- i thought i could count on rates below next year. >> i think demand is good. there will be a bit of inflation. people will be surprised. they ought to go get a mortgage now. they should be buying something now before that part of the economy heats up. housing stays strong. >> not europe. >> not europe. not asia. >> everyone is thinking about fiscal cliff. i have to go with i'm so worried about how many promises we've made in terms of $87 trillion of stuff we're not going to be able to afford and i am afraid we never, ever come to grips with it. >> that's why i think inflation is going to be an issue, joe, for exactly what you just said. kick the can does not last at 3% interest rates. it doesn't last. >> liesman is here. what's your -- he said if the jobless rate stays high is the biggest threat to 2013. why would the economy be bad? >> i'm worried about the long-term effect of joblessness
the economy's actually expanding, but they're still really worried about, you know, the fiscal cliff. >>> and now our fourth story "outfront" for the second day in a row, susan rice met with republican senators, some of whom obviously have harshly criticized her for ther handlin of the attack in benghazi. the moderate susan collins spoke to us. >> i continue to be troubled by the fact that the u.n. ambassador decided to play what was essentially a political role at the height of a contentious presidential election campaign. >> yet the president continues to stand by susan rice. >> susan rice is extraordinary. couldn't be prouder of the job that she's done at the u.n. >> all right, tim, when you hear senator collins, you know, she is influential, she is moderate, come out and say look, i'm not satisfied, sort of turning her back on susan rice, she had the moment in front of the microphone to endorse, she did not. should the administration cut its losses and say this might not be the right nominee. >> not at all. i think the president won the ele electi election. respect to suzanne col
investment bank should do is solve financial problems for people. with things like the fiscal cliff coming up and a radical change in tax rates and possible future growth rates, i just think there are going to be lots of decisions that need to be made. lots of interesting decisions that aren't just m&a. corporate boards need advice on that. i'm optimistic it will be a decent year. >> we hope to visit you during that year. thank you. >> back to you, melissa. >>> news for investors out there. let's send it to mary thompson for a market flash. >> cnbc obtaining a notice that the company is raising margin requirements for apple to 60% from 30% effective at midnight tonight. one thing we want to note is cnbc has spoken to other people on the equity desk. they say they are not planning to follow the raise of margin on requirements for apple. we want to note that core clearing will issue a statement on this later. back to you. >> all right. thank you very much, mary thompson. still ahead, live coverage of president obama's remarks on the fiscal cliff before the business roundtable. can the president
for an interview you'll only see on this network. see what he thinks about the fiscal cliff. >>> later on in the program, with the rush to sell high-end homes to take advantage of this year's lower tax rates, is it a good time now to snap them up? our wealth editor robert frank. plus, our real estate correspondent will tell you what you need to know back half of the show. don't miss it. >>> and here's a lye shot of the street outside the new york stock exchange. christmas tree is right behind the band there. they are ready for the tree lighting ceremony. expect it to take place about an hour from now. we'll take you there live. back in a moment. obligations. obligations. i need to rethink the core of my portfolio. what i really need is sleep. introducing the ishares core, building blocks for the heart of your portfolio. find out why 9 out of 10 large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. risk includ
fall off the fiscal cliff. avoiding it -- if they do nothing, everyone's taxes go up and automatic spending cuts will take effect. no imminent deal is in sight. >> if they are going to force higher rates on virtually all americans, because they're unwilling to let tax rates go up on 2% of americans, then that's a choice we're going to have to make. >> i would say we're nowhere. period. we're nowhere. we have put a serious offer on the table by putting revenues up there to try to get this question resolved. but the white house has responded with virtually nothing. they have actually asked for more revenue than they have been asking for the whole entire time. >> in other words not quite a good place to be, but both sides agree that the government needs to raise more money. how much and how they do it are two of the major sticking points. >>> and protests and a constitutional crisis, what is next for egypt. we'll dig deeper into the struggle for power between conservative islamists and liberal secularists. and later, brad pitt talks about his future with angelina jolie. >>> and a dog
put the chance of going over the fiscal cliff? >> i think the odds are somewhere in the neighborhood of about 15 ch about 15% to 20% that we go over. but my hope is that we don't. >> what happens to the market if we go over? >> i think we are going over, first of all. and i don't really think that we can get a good solution unless the markets force the issue. so one way or another, i think we have a near term correction. it either comes before the end of the year and forces the politicians to compromise now, or the beginning of next year and forces them after -- >> when does the bond market notice? i don't even care about the stock market. >> if you think you're going over the cliff, about the only hedge out there is like 30 year zeros. because think about what will happen. you'll slow the economy. they'll go to rates you couldn't believe if we really go over full bore. if we go right over with no solution at all -- >> what happens if we get a long term solution to all our problems? >> the thing you have to be scared of with rates is the thing you always have to be scared of, the eco
the fiscal cliff, which you just called serious business, or extending the lower tax rates and not the upper ones, which one would you choose? >> i'm going to do everything i can to avoid putting the american economy, the american people, through the fiasco of going over the fiscal cliff. >> which is worse, though, for the economy? >> what's that point of balance you just spoke about? could you put a debt limit increase in the overall package? >> as i told the president a couple weeks ago, there's a lot of things i've wanted in my life. but almost all of them had a price tag attached to them. and if we're going to talk about the debt limit in this, then we're probably -- there's going to be some price tag associated with it. >> last question. >> are you standing by your dollar for dollar -- >> i continue to believe that any increase in the debt limit has to be accompanied by spending reductions of that -- that meet or exceed it. >> thank you. >> with that, the happy talk azharry reid called it the other day is basically a thing of the past. speaker boehner saying he is disappointed in where
year. of course, if the fiscal cliff does come to be and the economy slows or dips back into recession, things will really slow down. what automakers are doing is continuing to push the sales of smaller cars, which is what the public wants, because tgas prics are rising. sales of these types of vehicles do real well in places like california where people drive long distances and where a lot of people are very concerned about the environment and want to drive hybrid or electric vehicles. so even though they haven't been so strong throughout the rest of the country, companies like general motors continue to push ahead with these vehicles. here is their newest introduction, which will be on the market in 2014. only available for sale in california and in oregon initially. this is the chevy spark. it is an all electric vehicle that will get somewhere south of 100 miles on a full charge. what's really cool about this vehicle is you'll be able to charge it up to 80% capacity in just 20 minutes. that is a challenge, though, getting the rest of america outside of places like california to buy
? this is big news. >>> in raw politics, with the country one day closer to the fiscal cliff, president obama took his case to the public today. he used an event in pennsylvania to rachet up the pressure on republicans to freeze taxes for the middle class while allowing the tax rates on the wealthy to go up. >> if congress does thing, every family in america will see their income taxes automatically go up on january 1st. that's sort of like the lump of coal you get for christmas. that's a scrooge christmas. >> in other words, the day after the white house puts its opening bid on the table, the president comes out swinging. that opening bid didn't have a whole lot of concessions in it to the republicans, and the republicans reacted as many would have predicted. they were mad. basically saying that offer was an insult. today, house speaker john boehner doubled down. >> it was not a serious proposal. and so right now, we're almost nowhere. >> that doesn't sound good. republican congressman lee terry of nebraska was just as succinct but how shall i say this? more colorful. he told the "omaha worl
, maybe we'd be okay with the fiscal cliff. he says that is the best deal for everyone, the best deal for progressives, just to do it. to go back to the clinton era rates. you get rid of three quarters of the deficit just on tax increases at that point. >> and he says you get defense cuts. >> you can't get defense cuts any other way. and he's not the only one. there's a lot of people on the left and there's quite a few people on the right. i'm glad you're optimistic and a lot of ceos and guys in your position -- if you run a company, you don't need consumers petrified and business people petrified. this is the last thing we need if you run a company. i understand you have a horse in the game. >> but you also have the double trigger. if you go over the cliff, we've got the debt ceiling fight right afterwards. it's not like that's six months down the line. that's in if first month, six weeks of the new year. >> the other thing, depending on where you stand, the idea that we just get rid of congressional approval of the debt ceiling at all, which is that ludicrous proposal that was in th
without the tax rates going back up. >> nobody wants to go over the cliff. that's why the day after the election i tried to speed this process up by making the concession to put revenues on the table. and it is unfortunate that the white house spent three weeks doing basically nothing. >> now, the republican counterproposal that we just heard about still includes those bush era tax cuts staying in place for everybody, which president obama has called a nonstarter. so what if we raised taxes a little bit? still be much lower than what americans paid just a generation ago. in 1980, the wealthiest americans paid a marginal tax rate of 70% of their income to uncle sam. now, tax reform under president reagan reduced that rate to 50% and in 1981, and closer to current levels in 1986. today, president obama wants to let the bush era tax cuts expire for wealthy americans only, taking up their marginal federal tax rate from 36% to 39.6%. we're talking about a 3.6 percentage point uptick for households making more than $250,000 a year, only on every dollar they make above the $250,000 amount.
to go off the fiscal cliff. and the reality is we have to look over the last two years. the republican party established themselves as the party that was willing to let americans entire credit rating go down the tubes in order to stop barack obama last year. it's very clear that most people are going to see them as being the party that's being more obstinate. the truth of the matter is they also because they lost so badly in the election, nobody wants to be seen playing footsie with barack obama under the table which is what they're going to have to do to get this deal done. the republican party is going tond up being blamed which is one of the reasons they will have to compromise more. it's the same thing the democrats did when bush won. you have to compromise with the party that just won. jason johnson, john brabender, thank you thank you both. >>> the new york film critics have made their choices for top films and many times they end up as oscar favorites. all the details next. all the details next. we are gathered here today to celebrate the union of tim and laura. it's amazing how
this "fiscal cliff." this political theater, if you don't allow these tax cuts to expire on the rich, the 1%, it's .25% coming off of gdp. you are losing a quarter percentage point. granted gdp numbers were better than we thought they would be. you are still losing a quarter percent if you let these tax cuts expire. it's an odd thing when we're so fragile on growth. >> let me take you to the trading element. what's happening is you get continued announcement of special dividends. you have been buying stocks on that basis. talk me through where you are now on perhaps what people may buy moving forward. >> it's a process that you really want to take into effect. it's got to be a company that you think is going to have some growth going forward. i bought winn. based on the company's fundamentals and then also for the kicker, the special dividend. that's something that i played. i also bought costco because i like the company's underlying fundamentals and a kicker for the special dividend there. you must like the company. >> that's important. the stock as it goes ex-dividend as we saw with choi
on u.s. states. we have a look at which ones face the biggest threat from the fiscal cliff. >>> later, if you own a car but never drive it, you might be able to make some money off it. ashton kutcher and marissa mayer are backing the start up. the ceo of get-around is coming up. gecko (clearing throat) thank you, mr. speaker, uh, members of congress. in celebration of over 75 years of our government employees insurance company, or geico...as most of you know members it.congress. ...i propose savings for everyone! i'm talking hundreds here... and furthermore.. newscaster:breaking news. the gecko is demanding free pudding. and political parties that are actual parties!? with cake! and presents! ah, that was good. too bad nobody could hear me. geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance. or that printing in color had to cost a fortune. nobody said an all-in-one had to be bulky. or that you had to print from your desk. at least, nobody said it to us. introducing the business smart inkjet all-in-one series from brother. easy to use. it's the ultimate comb
this afternoon with brand-new republican offers to try to save the $2.2 trillion and avoid the so-called fiscal cliff. the across-the-board spending cuts and sharp tax increases that hit in just 29 days. let's get straight to our senior congressional correspondent dana bash. she's watching what's going on. dana, the tax rates, first of all, let's get to a major sticking point right now. there's been a counterproposal from house republicans to the white house. you have details. >> reporter: that's right. let's start exactly where you just began on those tax rates because that has become the big divide between the two sides. the answer is the house republicans are not budging. they still want to continue the bush era tax rates at all income levels. let's get specific. first of all, the counterproposal, they say they would get about $800 billion in savings from what they call tax reform, from deductions and closing loopholes, things like that. but the bush era tax rates, all of them would remain, even for the wealthiest. to show you the difference, compared to the white house offer that they got l
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)